« 2011年1月 | トップページ | 2011年3月 »

2011年2月

2011年2月25日 (金)

Teikoku Bicycle Frame Restoration (Fork Removal)

次回、この記事の日本語版を投稿します。

In the previous post I introduced the Teikoku frame that I plan to restore. Before cleaning up the frame, the first thing is to remove the fork and bottom bracket. In this post we will remove the fork. But before that there are few tips to help prepare for a restoration.

POINTER:  Always be sure to take photos BEFORE disassembly.  This serves two purposes.
(1) A reference for re-assembly, which parts were originally where!
(2) A comparison of before/after.

POINTER:  "Well begun, half done".
It is critical that parts and information travel together. In other words, after removing a part it must be labeled (name, location, orientation, quantity, size, etc). I use assorted Ziplock bags and magic marker to record information directly on the bag.  Bags serve not only to organize the parts but also to prevent scratches. Small parts in small bags and all the components that comprise an assembly are placed into a larger bag.

Img_7380   

Img_8277

POINTER: The head typically contains 26 ball bearings in the upper portion and 26 ball bearings in the lower.  When loosening the locknut maintain a constant downward pressure on the head to prevent any gap from forming between the lower head cup and fork crown race.  Unlike bicycles with caged bearings, old bicycles have individual ball bearings and a gap will cause the ball bearings in the lower head cup to spill out!

Use a C-spanner to take off the top locknut, remove the light bracket, the second locknut and adjustable head cup (Shown from top to bottom in the photo below).

Img_8278 
Img_8279

The safest way to avoid losing any bearings is to first remove the bearings in the upper portion, turn the frame upside down and remove the fork and the bearings in the lower cup.

For reference purposes, the fork has been removed and all 25 ball bearings are shown in the upper head race.  The consistency of the grease changes over the years and this gummy substance kept the ball bearings stationary.
Img_8288

The chrome parts (locknuts, lamp bracket, adjustable cup, etc) can be cleaned up with steel wool.
Note steel wool comes in various grades:
Super Fine     0000
Extra Fine       000
Very Fine         00
Fine                  0
Medium              1
Medium Coarse  2
Coarse              3
Extra Coarse      4

POINT: Always start off with a finer grade and test the steel wool on an inconspicuous spot as there is the danger of removing the chrome plating if too coarse a grade is used.

Lamp bracket with Teikoku company logo.
Img_8350

Img_8348a

In the next post we will look at cottered bottom bracket disassembly. 

2011年2月18日 (金)

帝國自転車 (新古品 フレーム)①

I'll be back with another English post soon, until then stay trued and happy wheels.

去年手に入れた新古品フレーム。
残念ながらフレームのみ、パーツなし。
当時の別のメーカーのパーツを集め合わせて組み立てるしかありません。

帝國自転車というメーカーです。
このフレームは半世紀以上前のもの。Img_2397

メッキに結構錆びが付いているし、塗装も小さな傷多数あるが、この程度なら大したことはありません。
Img_2393

Img_2394

埃や汚れの下に微かに塗装のツヤがかすかに見えます。
Img_2392

フォーク先端はメッキ処理されています。
この剣先処理は上級モデルに使われていました。
Img_2396

フレームのオリジナル巻紙がところどころまだ付いています。
(ぼろぼろですが・・・)
フレーム巻紙が付いていることは必ずいいことだと限りません。
その巻紙の質とフレームの保管環境によります。
巻紙が水分を吸収して経年で塗装にくっつき、はがしたらコンパウンドでも取れない跡が残ってしまう場合がありました。
Img_2389

このシートチューブバッヂは実に大きいです。
日本語も英語も小さな字でぎっしり書かれています。
綺麗にしてルーペで何が書いてあるか解読するのが楽しみ。
自転車の年式の手口があるといい。
Img_2403

これは珍しい。
ボトムブラケットの構造にご注目。
コッターピン式の構造です。
この構造はイギリスで1930年代ごろ消えていきました。
Img_2398
Img_2391

シリアル番号はくっきりな刻印ではなく手掘りのようです。
「8」は三つあるが皆違います。
シートピラー調整ボルトの頭に社ロゴがあります。
Img_2400

インターネットで検索したら次の3点が分かりました。

(1)東京都荒川区に帝國自転車という店があるようです。
  荒川区は昔自転車製造会社が多かったようです。 
(2) 帝國自転車の看板(お店?) の写真(ヘッドバッジと全く同じ社ロゴ)がありました。
(3)明治21年、同社名でダルマ自転車の製造会社が浅草にありました。

このような古いものが話せたら、どのような話を語ってくれるでしょう。

2011年2月12日 (土)

Teikoku Bicycle NOS Frame (1)

次回、この記事の日本版を投稿します。

This is an old frame I picked up about a year ago.   It is a NOS (New Old Stock), so never been assembled.  Unfortunately, all I have is the frame so it will have to be pieced together with parts from the same period but different manufacturers.

The frame manufacturer is TEIKOKU.  My research shows that this company was making bicycles as far back as 1930's.  This particular frame probably hasn't seen the light of day for well over half a century.
Img_2397

Although the chromed parts have their fair share of rust and there are quite a few nicks to the paint, overall appears to be very restorable.  May look pretty rough now, but with a little steelwool to the chrome and compound to the paint she will clean up nicely.Img_2393

Img_2394

Even under the dust, dirt and grime, the typical three layered enamel paint still retains some vague signs of gloss.
Img_2392

Note the chrome tipped fork which is a clear indicator that this was a higher-end model.
Img_2396

The frame still retains some of its original frame-wrap, but it is quite tattered.  I have found that this frame-wrap can be a mixed blessing as the lower grade of frame-wrap is paper and absorbs moisture causing the paint to bubble up over the years.Img_2389

One of the largest seat tube badges I have ever come across.  Stamped in both Japanese and English, there is a full paragraph there and I'll have a closer look with a magnifying glass after I get it cleaned up. Hopefully it will lend a clue or two in helping to date the bicycle.
Img_2403

Check out the bottom bracket.  Yes, it is a cottered bottom bracket!
Most of these were phased out in England around 1930's.
Img_2398
Img_2391

The stamping is relatively crude compared with other models I have seen from 1950's.
The seat post bolt head has the company logo.
Img_2400

A quick internet search turned up some interesting leads. 
(1) There is a bicycle shop in Arakawa-ku which was one of the main bicycle production areas in Tokyo. 
(2)A photo of a shop with the Teikoku Bicycle sign, same logo as the one on this bicycle.
(3)There was a company by the same name producing Ordinary (Penny-farthing) bicycles in 1888.  Could this be a descendant?

Ah, if only old thing like these could talk, what stories they might tell.

2011年2月 5日 (土)

百聞は一見にしかず

I'll be back soon with another English post, until then stay trued and happy wheels!

「古い自転車って何がそんなに面白いの?」とよく聞かれます。
百聞は一見にしかず。
いくつかの短いビデオを通じて、昭和20年代後半~30年代前半の自転車の良さが分かっていただけるかと思います。
 

(ブログの幅が狭くて、ビデオの端が少し欠けてしまいます。
より良く見たい方はビデオの上のリンクをクリックしてユーチューブから直接に普通のサイズで見られます。)

昭和20年代後半~30年代前半に製造された自転車を見つけるのは決して楽ではありません。
見つかるとしても、大抵長年風雨にさらされて酷い状態です。
ヤフオクで「ジャンク」と出品される場合が多い。
しかし、手入れをすればゴミから宝へ。

ゴミから宝へ

当時は実用車の黄金時代と言っていいでしょう。
「一家、一台、一生」
家宝で庶民にとって唯一の交通手段。

昭和自転車 (導入編)


当時の自転車はシンプルで頑丈でオーバーエンジニアリング。一生使えます。
現在、メイドインジャパンは品質が良くて優れていて、家電製品、オートバイ、自動車と評判がいいです。
しかし、昔の日本はいい家電製品、オートバイ、自動車を作る前にいい自転車を作っていました。

当たり前かもしれませんが、現代の作りと違います。
もう現代自転車に付いていないものが多いです。

現代の作りと違う(前半)

現代の作りと違う(後半

戦後、自転車は日本経済成長に大きく貢献しました。
日本は自転車製造に力を入れ、旧英国植民地へ輸出しました。
昭和34年に英国を抜いて世界最大自転車生産国になりました。
このブログを通じて、当時の自転車の素晴らしさが、国内外のより多くの方々にわかっていただけるよう、頑張ります。

« 2011年1月 | トップページ | 2011年3月 »